On May 1, 2017, the US Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit affirmed the dismissal of United States ex rel. Petratos, et al. v. Genentech, Inc., et al., No. 15-3801 (3d. Cir. May 1, 2017). On appeal from the US District Court for the District of New Jersey, the Third Circuit reinforced the applicability of the materiality standard set forth by the US Supreme Court in Universal Health Services v. Escobar. Per the Court, the relator’s claims implicate “three interlocking federal schemes:” the False Claims Act (FCA), Medicare reimbursement, and US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval.

The relator, Gerasimos Petratos, was the former head of health care data analytics at Genentech.  He alleged that Genentech suppressed data related to the cancer drug Avastin, thereby causing physicians to certify incorrectly that the drug was “reasonable and necessary” for certain Medicare patients. This standard is drawn from Medicare’s statutory framework: “no payment may be made” for items and services that “are not reasonable and necessary for the diagnosis and treatment of illness or injury.” 42 U.S.C. § 1395y(a)(1)(A) (emphasis added).  In turn, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) consider whether a drug has received FDA approval in determining, for its part, whether a drug is “reasonable and necessary.” Petratos claimed that Genentech “ignored and suppressed data that would have shown that Avastin’s side effects for certain patients were more common and severe than reported.” Petratos further asserted that analyses of these data would have required the company to file adverse-event reports with the FDA and could have triggered the need to change Avastin’s FDA label.

Continue Reading Third Circuit Affirms Dismissal of FCA Suit against Genentech Based on Supreme Court’s Materiality Standard

The US Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit recently reviewed a district court’s dismissal of an FCA claim against the City of Chicago, in which the relator alleged that the City’s certifications of compliance with civil rights laws were false because the City engaged in practices which increased racial segregation. The case is United States ex rel. Hanna v. City of Chicago, and can be found here.

On August 22, the Seventh Circuit affirmed dismissal of the relator’s complaint for failure to comply with Fed. R. Civ. 9(b). The most notable takeaway from this case is the court’s holding that where the complaint itself did not specify which statutes and regulations the City violated (and with which it thus falsely certified compliance), the relator could not rely on more specific statutory and regulatory references later identified in his briefs. The court observed: “If the particularity requirement is meant to ensure more thorough investigation before filing, it is not too much to ask that one aspect of that investigation include the specific provisions of law whose violation made the certification of compliance false. Moreover, if, as in this case, a defendant is presented with an undifferentiated raft of statutory and regulatory provisions, it will be nearly impossible for the defendant to prepare a defense.” In other words, Rule 9(b) requires an FCA relator to plead his or her theory of fraud with specificity, and to do so in the complaint. Where the alleged fraud is based on a regulatory or statutory violation, relators cannot punt articulating what that statute or regulation actually was.

The court found a number of other Rule 9(b) pleading deficiencies in addition to the foregoing, serving as a reminder that the rule is a powerful tool to weed out meritless FCA claims.