Universal Health Services Inc. v. United States ex rel. Escobar

In the fourth of a related set of qui tam False Claims Act (FCA) suits, the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois granted summary judgment in favor of generics manufacturer Par Pharmaceutical Companies (Par). The court’s August 17, 2017, opinion in U.S. ex rel. Lisitza et al v. Par Pharmaceutical Co, Inc. held that the relator had not presented sufficient evidence to support an implied certification theory of FCA liability.

Like its sister cases, the relator in Par Pharmaceutical alleged that the defendant caused the submission of false claims to the Medicaid program via an unlawful prescription-switching scheme. The alleged scheme involved manufacturing generic drugs in forms and dosage strengths that were atypical and not covered by existing Medicaid reimbursement limits, then marketing the drugs to pharmacies based on their higher reimbursement potential. The pharmacies would then fill the scripts with the more expensive forms and dosages manufactured by Par. The relators also alleged that the drugs were dispensed without physician approval and without meeting the medical necessity and economic requirements of governing state and federal Medicaid regulations, in violation of the FCA.

Continue Reading Par Pharmaceutical Beats FCA Prescription-Switch Allegations

On March 2, 2017, the US District Court for the Southern District of New York applied the materiality standard announced by the Supreme Court of the United States in Universal Health Services, Inc. v. United States ex rel. Escobar to dismiss a relator’s complaint because the relator, a former managing director of Moody’s, failed to plead materiality as a matter of law.

In United States ex rel. Kolchinsky v. Moody’s Corp., the district court had previously dismissed with prejudice four of five categories of claims, and dismissed without prejudice the relator’s “Ratings Delivery Service” claim, i.e., that Moody’s provided inaccurate ratings directly to subscribers, including government agencies.  In his Second Amended Complaint, the relator attempted to cure the pleading defects of Ratings Delivery Service claim in a “124-page tome,” but to no avail. Continue Reading SDNY Dismisses Sub-Prime Mortgage Crisis Complaint on Materiality Grounds Because Government Paid Claims Despite Notice of Alleged Fraud

On June 16, 2016, the Supreme Court of the United States issued an important decision regarding the implied certification theory of liability under the False Claims Act (FCA) in which it vacated a decision of the US Court of Appeals for the First Circuit and remanded the case for further proceedings in accordance with the opinion.  A copy of the decision can be found here.

Because of McDermott’s ongoing role in this active matter, we will not be providing extensive public analysis at this time.  However, we are pleased that the Supreme Court has vacated the opinion of the First Circuit Court of Appeals ruling against Arbour Counseling Services. The Court expressly and unanimously “disagree[d] with” the lower court’s view and stated that “[t]he False Claims Act does not adopt such an extraordinarily expansive view of liability.” It is significant that the Court remanded to the lower court to reconsider the case under the new, rigorous standard of materiality stated by the Supreme Court.  Our client looks forward to litigating the case on remand and is confident of prevailing under the new Supreme Court standard.