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Dash to Digital Health? How the Regulatory Sprint to Coordinated Care Could Expand Access to Care

Certain long-standing laws, such as the civil monetary penalty provision prohibiting patient inducements, have hampered providers’ ability to fully leverage remote patient monitoring and other telehealth tools. Many stakeholders are hoping that developments in the Regulatory Sprint to Coordinated Care will begin the rulemaking process to enable greater access to digital health and virtual care products. The US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) launched the Regulatory Sprint to Coordinated Care in 2018 with the goal of reducing regulatory burden and incentivizing coordinated care. As part of this initiative, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and other agencies are scrutinizing a variety of long-standing regulatory requirements and prohibitions to determine whether they unnecessarily hinder the innovative arrangements policy-makers are otherwise hoping to see develop. While regulations such as the civil monetary penalty prohibition on...

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Northern District of California Dismisses FCA Claim with Prejudice for Inability to Point to Particular Claims for Payment

On October 1, 2018, the District Court for the Northern District of California dismissed with prejudice a relator’s qui tam suit against Carelink Hospice Services, Inc. (Carelink) for failure to meet the heightened pleading standards mandated by Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 9(b). The court’s decision largely rested on the relator’s inability to specifically plead the existence of identifiable false claims—a strong affirmation that, in the Ninth Circuit, courts continue to hold relators to their pleading burdens. The relator worked for Carelink, a hospice provider, for a three-month period in 2015. As a hospice provider, Carelink needed to provide certifications of terminal illness to justify admissions to the facility and, in turn, receive reimbursements from Medicare for services rendered. The relator, without identifying particular claims for reimbursement or patients, alleged that Carelink violated the FCA by seeking reimbursement for patients who...

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Third Circuit Affirms Dismissal of FCA Suit against Genentech Based on Supreme Court’s Materiality Standard

On May 1, 2017, the US Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit affirmed the dismissal of United States ex rel. Petratos, et al. v. Genentech, Inc., et al., No. 15-3801 (3d. Cir. May 1, 2017). On appeal from the US District Court for the District of New Jersey, the Third Circuit reinforced the applicability of the materiality standard set forth by the US Supreme Court in Universal Health Services v. Escobar. Per the Court, the relator’s claims implicate “three interlocking federal schemes:” the False Claims Act (FCA), Medicare reimbursement, and US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval. The relator, Gerasimos Petratos, was the former head of health care data analytics at Genentech.  He alleged that Genentech suppressed data related to the cancer drug Avastin, thereby causing physicians to certify incorrectly that the drug was “reasonable and necessary” for certain Medicare patients. This standard is drawn from Medicare’s statutory framework: “no payment...

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RehabCare Settles False Claims Act Allegations for $125 Million

RehabCare, the nation’s largest provider of nursing home rehabilitation services, agreed to pay $125 million on January 12 to settle claims under the False Claims Act (FCA) in connection with allegations that it caused its skilled nursing facility customers to submit false claims to Medicare for therapy services. In connection with the settlement, RehabCare entered into a corporate integrity agreement (CIA) with the Office of Inspector General (OIG). The provider’s companies, RehabCare Group, Inc. and RehabCare Group East, Inc. (RehabCare), have been subsidiaries of Kindred Healthcare, Inc. (Kindred) since their merger in 2011 with a Kindred subsidiary. In a press release, Kindred stated that it agreed to the settlement without any admission of wrongdoing in order to provide clarity for contract customers, shareholders and government oversight entities. The government’s unsealed Complaint in Intervention alleged that RehabCare manipulated the amount and type...

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Recent DOJ Enforcement Actions Demonstrate that the Focus on Mental Health Services Fraud Continues

Two recent actions announced by the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), one civil and one criminal, along with a recent speech by Assistant Attorney General Leslie R. Caldwell, illustrate the current climate of government enforcement related to mental health services (i.e., intensive outpatient psychotherapy (IOP) and partial hospitalization program (PHP) services).  In her speech, Caldwell specifically mentioned mental health as one of the areas the DOJ has targeted through its increasing use of data analytics to identify suspicious billing patterns. On May 7, 2015, the DOJ announced that 16 hospitals agreed to pay a combined $15.69 million to resolve a qui tam lawsuit filed under the False Claims Act (FCA), with the relator receiving approximately $2.67 million.  According to the DOJ, Health Management Associates (HMA) and 14 hospitals formerly owned and operated by HMA, Community Health Systems and its subsidiary Wesley Medical Center, and North Texas...

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