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When an FCA Case Just Won’t Go Away: Attorneys’ Fees Remain Contested Even After Settlement

When settling a False Claims Act (FCA) case, the issue of a relator’s attorneys’ fees seems small compared to the monetary settlement and the breadth of the release. Two recent cases, however, demonstrate that fees can prove a sticking point in wrapping up an FCA case even after settlement. In U.S. ex. rel. Simring v. Rutgers, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit remanded a fee award entered after a settlement, finding that the lower court provided insufficient detail to review the reasonableness of deductions to a fee application. In U.S. ex. rel. Doghramji v. Community Health Systems Inc., the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Tennessee evaluated whether a settlement agreement carve-out permitting objections to the relators’ attorneys’ fees permitted defendants to argue that the fees were barred by either the FCA’s “first to file” or “public disclosure” bar. The court decided that the carve-out did not protect such objections. The...

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Supreme Court Rules on Wartime Tolling of FCA Statute of Limitations and FCA’s First-to-File Bar in Kellogg Brown & Root v. United States ex rel. Carter

On May 26, 2015, the Supreme Court issued a unanimous opinion in Kellogg Brown & Root v. United States ex rel. Carter (S. Ct. No. 12-1497), a case addressing several important issues under the False Claims Act (FCA).  In a previous post, we laid out the two issues in this case.  First, when the United States is at war, does the Wartime Suspension of Limitations Act (WSLA) toll the statute of limitations in civil FCA lawsuits?  Second, does the FCA’s so-called “first-to-file” bar prevent all future cases based on the same alleged fraud, or is it a one-case-at-a-time rule, allowing duplicative claims in the future as long as the first action is settled or dismissed? The Court ruled in favor of Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) on the first issue, holding that the WSLA only tolls the statute of limitations for criminal offenses, not in civil false claims like the relator filed against KBR.  The WSLA tolls the statute of limitations for “any offense” involving...

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Supreme Court Vets Wartime Tolling of FCA Statute of Limitations in Kellogg Brown & Root v. United States ex rel. Carter

On January 13, 2015, the Supreme Court held oral argument in the closely followed case of Kellogg Brown & Root v. United States ex rel. Carter.  Two questions with sweeping False Claims Act (FCA) enforcement implications were at issue:  first, whether the Wartime Suspension of Limitations Act (WSLA) tolls the statute of limitations in civil actions under the FCA while the nation is at war; and second, whether the FCA’s so-called “first-to-file” bar prohibits future filings based on the same alleged fraud or functions as a more permissive one-case-at-a-time rule, allowing duplicative claims in future actions.  The lower court, the Fourth Circuit, held that the qui tam relator’s claims were timely.  Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) appealed. Made relevant by over a decade of global military action, the WSLA was a little known criminal code provision tolling the statute of limitations for “any offense” involving fraud against the  United States during war....

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