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Stark Law Proposed Change Affects Group Practice Special Rules for Productivity Bonuses, Profit Shares

On October 9, 2019, the US Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published proposed changes to the physician self-referral law (Stark Law). Physician practices are subject to the Stark Law, and the proposed rule includes an important clarification affecting certain group practices’ compensation models. CMS proposes to revise its regulations to clarify the special rule for group practice distributions of income from Stark designated health services (DHS). Compliance with this special rule is a requirement of the Stark Law’s definition of a “group practice,” and compliance with the “group practice” definition is generally necessary for physician groups to have the protection of the in-office ancillary services (IOAS) exception to the Stark Law. The special rule for sharing DHS profits permits a group, or a pod of five or more physicians in the group, to pool their DHS income and distribute the pool in a manner...

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Court Upholds CMS’ Prohibition on ‘Under-Arrangements’ Transactions, Strikes Down CMS’ Prohibition on ‘Per-Click’ Equipment Rental Arrangements

A 2008 rule change from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS)—which effectively prohibited referring physician-owned companies from furnishing hospital services “under arrangements”—has withstood a challenge by a urology trade association. On June 12, 2015, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit (D.C. Circuit) held in Council for Urological Interests v. Burwell that the 2008 rule change, which redefined an “entity furnishing designated health services” to include entities that perform the services, not just bill for them, constituted a reasonable construction of the Stark Law and was entitled to deference. The appellate court, however, held that CMS’ prohibition on “per-click” equipment rental arrangements lacked a rational basis in light of the agency’s “tortured reading” of a relevant conference report, which, the court noted, was “the stuff of caprice.” Accordingly, the court struck down CMS’ 2008 prohibition on per-click...

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