On May 26, 2015, the Supreme Court issued a unanimous opinion in Kellogg Brown & Root v. United States ex rel. Carter (S. Ct. No. 12-1497), a case addressing several important issues under the False Claims Act (FCA).  In a previous post, we laid out the two issues in this case.  First, when the United States is at war, does the Wartime Suspension of Limitations Act (WSLA) toll the statute of limitations in civil FCA lawsuits?  Second, does the FCA’s so-called “first-to-file” bar prevent all future cases based on the same alleged fraud, or is it a one-case-at-a-time rule, allowing duplicative claims in the future as long as the first action is settled or dismissed? The Court ruled in favor of Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) on the first issue, holding that the WSLA only tolls the statute of limitations for criminal offenses, not in civil false claims like the relator filed against KBR.  The WSLA tolls the statute of limitations for “any offense” involving...

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