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DOJ Settlement with Florida Medical Practice Serves as a Reminder: Delayed Repayment to Federal Programs Can Have Significant Consequences

While medical practices are generally aware that relators and the government pursue allegations of false or duplicative claims to federal health care programs, a recent settlement reflects a growing trend of False Claims Act (FCA) allegations concerning the failure to report and return identified overpayments. On October 13, 2017, the US Department of Justice (DOJ) announced that it had reached a $450,000 settlement with First Coast Cardiovascular Institute, P.A. (FCCI) of Jacksonville, Florida in a qui tam lawsuit alleging that FCCI failed to promptly return identified overpayments from federal health care programs after the overpayments came to the attention of the practice’s leadership. According to DOJ, FCCI accrued credit balances or overpayments—a common occurrence in instances where two insurers share responsibility for payment—from Medicare, Medicaid, TRICARE and the Department of Veterans Affairs, totaling more than $175,000. DOJ alleged that,...

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DOJ Settlement with Home Health Providers Underscores Strategic Considerations for Self-Disclosure

Eventually, any health care organization with an effective compliance program is very likely to discover an issue that raises potential liability and requires disclosure to a government entity. While we largely discuss False Claims Act (FCA) litigation and defense issues on this blog, a complementary issue is how to address matters that raise potential liability risks for an organization proactively. On August 11, 2017, a group of affiliated home health providers in Tennessee (referred to collectively as “Home Health Providers”) entered into an FCA settlement agreement with the US Department of Justice (DOJ) and the US Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General (OIG) for $1.8 million to resolve self-disclosed, potential violations of the Stark Law, the Federal Anti-Kickback Statute, and a failure to meet certain Medicare coverage and payment requirements for home health services. This settlement agreement underscores the strategic...

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New OIG Rules Change Patient Incentive Program Landscape: Where Are the Limits Now?

With health care becoming more consumer-driven, health care providers and health plans are wrestling with how to incentivize patients to participate in health promotion programs and treatment plans. As payments are increasingly being tied to quality outcomes, a provider’s ability to engage and improve patients’ access to care may both improve patient outcomes and increase providers’ payments. In December 2016, the Office of Inspector General of the US Department of Health and Human Services (OIG) issued a final regulation implementing new “safe harbors” for certain patient incentive arrangements and programs, and released its first Advisory Opinion (AO) under the new regulation in March 2017. Together, the new regulation and AO provide guardrails for how patient engagement and access incentives can be structured to avoid penalties under the federal civil monetary penalty statute (CMP) and the anti-kickback statute (AKS). Read the full article.

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First 60 Day Rule Overpayment Case Ends with Almost $3 Million Settlement

As part of a settlement agreement reached on August 23, three hospitals and their former parent system agreed to pay $2.95 million to resolve state and federal False Claims Act (FCA) allegations that they failed to investigate and repay overpayments from the New York Medicaid program in a timely manner under the so-called “60 Day Rule.” The allegations were originally made by a former employee via a 2011 qui tam suit, United States of America ex rel. Kane v. Continuum Health Partners, Inc. Under the 60 Day Rule, enacted as part of the Affordable Care Act in 2010, providers are required to report and return overpayments within 60 days of identification. When “identification” happens has been the subject of much debate, and was one of the main issues in the decision issued by the US District Court in the Southern District of New York last year, which denied Continuum's motion to dismiss the government's complaint. Despite repaying all of the improper claims,...

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CMS Issues Final Rule Governing the Return of Overpayments within 60 Days

On February 11, 2016, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued the much-anticipated final rule concerning Section 6402(a) of the Affordable Care Act, the so-called "60 Day Rule." This section requires Medicare and Medicaid providers, suppliers and managed care contractors to report and return an overpayment by the later of “60 days after the date upon which the overpayment was identified or the date any corresponding cost report was due, if applicable.” CMS delayed adopting the rule to address public comments concerning, among other things, (1) the meaning of "identify" (i.e., what starts the 60-day clock); and (2) the length of the “lookback period.” This rule is of critical importance to healthcare providers seeking to avoid liability for reverse false claims under the False Claims Act (FCA). Under the new regulation, 42 C.F.R. § 401.305, the 60-day clock starts when a provider has identified an overpayment, which is defined as “when the...

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District Court Denies Motion to Dismiss in Government’s First Reverse False Claims Case

On August 3, 2015, the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York issued  an opinion interpreting the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) so-called “60-day rule.”  In United States of America ex rel. Kane v. Continuum Health Partners, Inc., Case No. 11-2325.  The court denied the defendants’ motion to dismiss the government’s False Claims Act (FCA) complaint alleging failure to timely report and refund overpayments pursuant to the 60-day rule, in violation of the FCA’s “reverse false claims” provision.  In doing so, the district court provided the first guidance on what it means for an overpayment to be “identified” by a provider, thereby triggering the ACA’s 60-day repayment period under 42 U.S.C. § 1320a-7k(d).  The court held that the 60-day clock for an “identified overpayment” starts running “when a provider is put on notice of a potential overpayment, rather than the moment when an overpayment is conclusively ascertained.” Continuum...

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U.S. Departments of Justice and Health and Human Services Issue FY 2014 Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control Program Report

Last week, the U.S. Departments of Justice (DOJ) and Health and Human Services (HHS) announced that the Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control (HCFAC) Program has recovered over $27.8 billion since its inception in 1996.  In FY 2014 alone, with a collective budget of $571.7 million, HCFAC efforts recovered $3.3 billion from individuals and companies facing allegations of fraud related to health care.  Jointly directed by the Attorney General and Secretary of HHS, HCFAC seeks to: Coordinate federal, state and local law enforcement efforts relating to health care fraud and abuse with respect to health plans; Conduct investigations, audits, inspections and evaluations relating to the delivery of and payment for health care in the United States; Facilitate enforcement of all applicable remedies for such fraud; and Provide education and guidance regarding compliance with current health care law. Over the past three years, for each dollar spent on health care-related...

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FCA Enforcement Action to Watch: Government Intervened in Reverse False Claims Case

With a motion to dismiss pending in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York, United States of America ex rel. Kane v. Continuum Health Partners, Inc., Case No. 11-2325, is the False Claims Act (FCA) case to watch in 2015.  It is the first “reverse false claims” case where the United States intervened, and its only allegation involves a failure to timely report and refund overpayments to the government. In 2010, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) modified the FCA’s reverse false claims provision (31 U.S.C. § 3729(a)(1)(G)), making a party liable for failing to report and return an overpayment within 60 days of the date it is “identified.”  See 42 U.S.C. § 1320a−7k(d).  Five years after the passage of the ACA, however, it remains unclear what it means for an overpayment to be “identified,” thereby triggering the 60-day clock.  The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has not issued any guidance concerning refunding...

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CMS Delays Implementation of the 60-Day Overpayment Final Rule

On February 13, 2015, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced a one-year extension to its normal three-year deadline to finalize the proposed rule explaining the Affordable Care Act’s “60-Day Rule” – leaving providers and their counsel with the same unanswered questions on how to comply and manage potential False Claims Act (FCA) risk. When Congress passed the Affordable Care Act in 2010, it amended the Social Security Act to add Section 1128J.  This section requires Medicare and Medicaid providers, suppliers and managed care contractors to report and return an overpayment by the later of “60 days after the date upon which the overpayment was identified or the date any corresponding cost report was due, if applicable.” CMS published a proposed rule applying this provision to Medicare Part A and B overpayments on February 16, 2012.  The proposed rule defines when an overpayment is “identified” as when the provider or supplier has “actual...

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