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Joshua (Josh) T. Buchman focuses his practice on white-collar criminal defense, internal investigations and complex commercial litigation. He represents corporate clients in the health care, manufacturing and defense contracting industries, in civil litigation and in corporate internal investigations. Josh has deep knowledge of False Claims Act litigation, and obtained a complete victory for a defense contractor client in a case involving $600 million in single damages exposure. He also represents individuals involved in government investigations. Read Joshua T. Buchman's full bio.

In a case of first impression, a federal court found that the federal physician self-referral law’s (Stark Law) requirement that financial arrangements with physicians be memorialized in a signed writing could be material to the government’s payment decision. This case raises troubling questions about applying the False Claims Act (FCA) to what many in the industry consider “technical” Stark issues, especially given the Supreme Court’s description of the materiality test as “demanding” and not satisfied by “minor or insubstantial” regulatory noncompliance.

United States ex rel. Tullio Emanuele v. Medicor Associates (Emanuele), in the US District Court for the Western District of Pennsylvania, involves Medicor Associates, Inc., a private medical group practice (Medicor), and Hamot Medical Center’s (Hamot) exclusive provider of cardiology coverage. Tullio Emanuele, a qui tam relator and former physician member of Medicor, alleged that Hamot, Medicor, and four of Medicor’s shareholder-employee cardiologists (the Physicians) violated the FCA and Stark Law because Hamot’s multiple medical director compensation arrangements with Medicor failed to satisfy the signed writing requirement in the Stark Law’s personal services or fair market value exceptions during various periods of time. The US Department of Justice declined to intervene in the case, but filed a statement of interest in the summary judgment stage supporting the relator’s position.
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Released on March 27, 2017, the Compliance Program Resource Guide (Resource Guide), jointly prepared by the US Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General (OIG) and the Health Care Compliance Association (HCCA) reflects the result of a “roundtable” meeting on January 17, 2017, of OIG staff and compliance professionals “to discuss ways

Health care general counsel should advise their clients on the implications of the new guidelines on corporate conduct recently released by the Department of Justice (DOJ). These guidelines demonstrate a substantially increased government focus on individual accountability for corporate misconduct, and on corporate eligibility for cooperation credit in the context of government investigations.

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