Tag Archives: implied certification

Fourth Circuit Decision in Triple Canopy Sets up Another Implied Certification Circuit Split

On May 16, 2017, the US Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit issued a decision in US ex rel. Badr v. Triple Canopy, Inc. In this case, the government had contracted with a private security company to provide guards at a military airbase in Iraq. Although the applicable contract required the guards to have … Continue Reading

SDNY Dismisses Sub-Prime Mortgage Crisis Complaint on Materiality Grounds Because Government Paid Claims Despite Notice of Alleged Fraud

On March 2, 2017, the US District Court for the Southern District of New York applied the materiality standard announced by the Supreme Court of the United States in Universal Health Services, Inc. v. United States ex rel. Escobar to dismiss a relator’s complaint because the relator, a former managing director of Moody’s, failed to … Continue Reading

Hospital’s Reasonable Interpretation of Ambiguous Law Supports Dismissal of Relator’s Case

In a decision issued August 8th, the Eighth Circuit affirmed the dismissal of a whistleblower’s False Claims Act (FCA) suit alleging the University of Minnesota Medical Center-Fairview (UMMC) wrongly claimed a “children’s hospital” exemption to Medicaid cuts based on a reasonable interpretation of an unclear state law. In 2011, Minnesota passed an amendment that cut … Continue Reading

Supreme Court Vacates First Circuit’s Expansive View of Implied Certification Liability

On June 16, 2016, the Supreme Court of the United States issued an important decision regarding the implied certification theory of liability under the False Claims Act (FCA) in which it vacated a decision of the US Court of Appeals for the First Circuit and remanded the case for further proceedings in accordance with the … Continue Reading

Condition of Payment Limitation on Implied Certification Cases is Alive and Well in the D.C. Circuit

To the extent there was ever any doubt about the vitality the “condition of payment” limitation on “implied certification” False Claims Act (FCA) cases in the D.C. Circuit, the court put that doubt to rest on Friday, July 10 in United States ex rel. Davis v. District of Columbia, No. 14-7060, 2015 WL 4153919 (D.C. … Continue Reading

Court Again Rejects Alleged ‘Fraud on the FDA’ Theory of Implied Certification Liability

On June 12, 2015, the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California granted Gilead Science’s second motion to dismiss Relators’ False Claims Act (FCA) claims premised on Gilead’s alleged failure to obtain timely supplemental approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use of a new unapproved manufacturing source. See U.S. … Continue Reading

The Fourth Circuit Denies Triple Canopy’s Petition for Rehearing En Banc

We have previously posted about the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit’s January 8 panel decision in U.S. ex rel. Badr v. Triple Canopy and its implications for “implied certification” False Claims Act (FCA) claims based on breaches of contract in the Fourth Circuit.  On Monday, March 9, the Fourth  Circuit denied … Continue Reading

Skinner v. Armet Armored Vehicles, Inc.: One District Court’s Attempt to Apply Triple Canopy

We recently posted about the Fourth Circuit’s decision in United States ex rel. Badr v. Triple Canopy, — F.3d —-, 2015 WL 105374 (4th Cir. Jan. 8, 2015).  In that case, the court explicitly recognized the implied certification theory of liability under the False Claims Act (FCA) and held that some contractual violations can give … Continue Reading

The Fourth Circuit’s Triple Canopy Decision: Implied Certification Versus “Garden-Variety” Breaches of Contract (and does the Government’s intervention decision matter to the analysis?)

The Fourth Circuit’s January 8, 2015 decision in United States ex rel. Badr v. Triple Canopy, Inc. is notable in several respects.  The decision announces the court’s explicit endorsement of the “implied certification” theory of False Claims Act (FCA) liability.  However, it leaves some uncertainty regarding how that theory is to be applied in courts within … Continue Reading
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