Tag Archives: DOJ

DOJ Settlement with Home Health Providers Underscores Strategic Considerations for Self-Disclosure

Eventually, any health care organization with an effective compliance program is very likely to discover an issue that raises potential liability and requires disclosure to a government entity. While we largely discuss False Claims Act (FCA) litigation and defense issues on this blog, a complementary issue is how to address matters that raise potential liability … Continue Reading

Latest District Court Decision Confirms Escobar Two-Part Implied Certification Test

One of the most litigated issues following the Supreme Court’s Escobar decision is whether the Court created a limited, two-part test to define the implied certification theory under the False Claims Act. In the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, the prevailing view confirms that the proper interpretation of Escobar is that the … Continue Reading

Physician Compensation Scrutiny Continues in Recent FCA Settlement

A hospital system in Missouri recently agreed to settle with the US Department of Justice (DOJ) for $34 million to resolve claims related to alleged violations of the Stark Law. On May 18, 2017, DOJ announced a settlement agreement with Mercy Hospital Springfield (Hospital) and its affiliate, Mercy Clinic Springfield Communities (Clinic). The Hospital and … Continue Reading

False Claims Act Settlement with eClinicalWorks Raises Questions for Electronic Health Record Software Vendors

On May 31, 2017, the US Department of Justice announced a Settlement Agreement under which eClinicalWorks, a vendor of electronic health record software, agreed to pay $155 million and enter into a five-year Corporate Integrity Agreement to resolve allegations that it caused its customers to submit false claims for Medicare and Medicaid meaningful use payments … Continue Reading

Is the Stark Law’s “Signed Writing” Requirement Material to Payment: One Federal Court Says Yes

In a case of first impression, a federal court found that the federal physician self-referral law’s (Stark Law) requirement that financial arrangements with physicians be memorialized in a signed writing could be material to the government’s payment decision. This case raises troubling questions about applying the False Claims Act (FCA) to what many in the … Continue Reading

How to Use the New OIG-HCCA Compliance Resource Guide in Your Compliance Program

Released on March 27, 2017, the Compliance Program Resource Guide (Resource Guide), jointly prepared by the US Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General (OIG) and the Health Care Compliance Association (HCCA) reflects the result of a “roundtable” meeting on January 17, 2017, of OIG staff and compliance professionals “to discuss ways … Continue Reading

DOJ Releases Detailed Criteria for Evaluating Compliance Programs

The Department of Justice (DOJ) doubled-down on emphasizing corporate compliance programs with new guidance from the Criminal Division Fraud Section with the “Evaluation of Corporate Compliance Programs” (Criteria).  This document, released February 8 without much fanfare, contains a long list of benchmarks that DOJ says it will use to evaluate the effectiveness of an organization’s … Continue Reading

Federal Health Care Fraud and Abuse Enforcement Made a Strong Showing in FY 2016

According to a report released last week, the Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control Program (HCFAC) returned over $3.3 billion to the federal government or private individuals as a result of its health care enforcement efforts in fiscal year (FY) 2016, its 20th year in operation. Established by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act … Continue Reading

Cooperation in the Eye of the Beholder: DOJ Official Bill Baer Elaborates on Cooperation in False Claims Act and Other Civil Enforcement Matters

The law is uncertain. One example of this uncertainty is how the “Yates memo” is to be applied in civil cases — in particular, what constitutes “cooperation” and how cooperation may benefit a company under investigation for False Claims Act violations. On September 29, 2016, DOJ attempted (for a second time) to address the lack … Continue Reading

The Perils of Parallel Proceedings: To Stay or Not to Stay

One of the more concerning trends for the defense bar in False Claims Act cases is an uptick in parallel criminal and civil proceedings. While the pursuit of parallel proceedings is long-standing DOJ policy, the last few years have seen a “doubling down” by the government on the use of these proceedings — for instance, … Continue Reading

Acting Associate Attorney General Remarks on Yates Memorandum and False Claims Act

On June 9, 2016, Acting Associate Attorney General Bill Baer delivered a speech regarding the impact of the Yates Memorandum’s focus on individual accountability and corporate cooperation at the American Bar Association’s 11th National Institute on Civil False Claims Act and Qui Tam Enforcement.  The focus of the speech was on the interplay between the … Continue Reading

DOJ Appealing AseraCare Loss

On May 27, 2016, the US Department of Justice said it will appeal to the Eleventh Circuit its loss in the False Claims Act (FCA) case against hospice chain AseraCare Inc. The government’s decision to appeal comes as no surprise, and it means that the substantial attention this case has received will continue. As a … Continue Reading

“Operation Spinal Cap” Sees Former Hospital Executive, Physicians Charged for Their Roles in Kickback Scheme

Last week, the Department of Justice (DOJ) announced charges against a former hospital CFO, two orthopedic surgeons, a chiropractor, and a health care marketer for their alleged roles in a series of fraudulent referral and billing schemes.  According to the DOJ, these referral schemes paid illegal kickbacks to physicians for spinal surgery referrals and caused … Continue Reading

U.S. Attorney Manual Revised To Reflect Yates Memorandum’s Focus on Individuals

On September 9, 2015, Deputy Attorney General Sally Quillian Yates issued a memorandum outlining the Department of Justice’s increased focused on individual responsibility in investigations of corporate wrongdoing, now colloquially referred to as the “Yates Memorandum.”  (We previously reported on the Memorandum here). Pursuant to the Yates Memorandum’s directive that the U.S. Attorneys’ Manual (USAM) … Continue Reading

DOJ’s “Yates Memorandum” Calls for Increased Focus on Individuals in Investigating Allegations of Both Criminal and Civil Corporate Wrongdoing

On September 9, 2015, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) released a memorandum to prosecutors nationwide regarding “Individual Accountability for Corporate Wrongdoing,” authored by Deputy Attorney General Sally Q. Yates.  Dubbed the “Yates Memorandum,” this missive consolidates both long-standing DOJ policy and newly minted guidance for prosecutors and civil enforcement attorneys that could significantly alter … Continue Reading

DOJ Announces Largest Kickback Settlement with Nursing Home for Medical Directorship Allegations

Barely a week after the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Office of Inspector General (OIG) issued a new fraud alert about Anti-Kickback Statute compliance risks with medical director arrangements, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) announced a $17 million False Claims Act settlement with a nursing home for alleged kickback violations concerning medical director … Continue Reading

Bifurcation Squarely Within Court’s Discretion, Notwithstanding DOJ’s Motion for Reconsideration

On June 10, 2015, the Department of Justice moved for reconsideration of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Alabama’s May 20 decision in U.S. ex rel. Paradies v. AseraCare, Inc., a False Claims Act (FCA) case in which the court ordered bifurcation of the element of falsity from the element of scienter … Continue Reading

Recent DOJ Enforcement Actions Demonstrate that the Focus on Mental Health Services Fraud Continues

Two recent actions announced by the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), one civil and one criminal, along with a recent speech by Assistant Attorney General Leslie R. Caldwell, illustrate the current climate of government enforcement related to mental health services (i.e., intensive outpatient psychotherapy (IOP) and partial hospitalization program (PHP) services).  In her speech, Caldwell … Continue Reading

U.S. Departments of Justice and Health and Human Services Issue FY 2014 Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control Program Report

Last week, the U.S. Departments of Justice (DOJ) and Health and Human Services (HHS) announced that the Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control (HCFAC) Program has recovered over $27.8 billion since its inception in 1996.  In FY 2014 alone, with a collective budget of $571.7 million, HCFAC efforts recovered $3.3 billion from individuals and companies … Continue Reading
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