Archives: State Law Claims

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DC Council Introduces False Claims Expansion – Taxpayers Beware!

Last month, a bill (The False Claims Amendment Act of 2017, B22-0166) was introduced by District of Columbia Councilmember Mary Cheh that would allow tax-related false claims against large taxpayers. Co-sponsors of the bill include Chairman Jack Evans and Councilmember Anita Bonds. Specifically, the bill would amend the existing false claims statute to expressly authorize … Continue Reading

Old Dog, New Tricks: Fraud and Abuse in the Age of Payment Reform

The good, reassuring news about that “old dog” fraud and abuse as it enters an age of payment reform is that criminal liability for fraud still requires a specific intent to defraud the federal health care programs, anti-kickback liability still requires actual knowledge of at least the wrongfulness, if not the illegality, of the financial … Continue Reading

Illinois Appellate Court Affirms Dismissal of State Tax Qui Tam Lawsuit

On March 31, 2015, the Illinois Appellate Court issued an opinion affirming the dismissal of a qui tam lawsuit filed by a law firm acting as a whistleblower on behalf of the State of Illinois against QVC, Inc., under the Illinois False Claims Act.  The opinion affirmed an important precedent previously set by the court … Continue Reading

Update On False Claims Developments at the State Level

On March 21, 2015, the Maryland state senate passed a revised version of Bill No. 374, which, as previously noted, would create a state version of the federal False Claims Act (FCA) if signed into law.  As amended, however, the proposed statute is somewhat less plaintiff-friendly than before.  For example, it: imposes an absolute 10-year … Continue Reading

States Continue to Develop False Claims Act Analogs

On February 6, 2015, both houses of the Maryland legislature introduced bills that would add Maryland to the growing list of states with their own version of the False Claims Act (FCA).  If signed into law, Maryland will, effective October 1, 2015, impose a $10,000 civil penalty and triple damages for, inter alia, “knowingly present[ing] … Continue Reading
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