Archives: Defense Contracting

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Sixth Circuit Hits Federal Government with $450,000+ in Legal Fees to be Paid to FCA Defendant Under the Equal Access to Justice Act

In an unusual ruling on August 18, 2017, the US Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit reversed the Middle District of Tennessee’s denial of the defendant’s motion for attorneys’ fees, and remanded the case for an award of legal fees and expenses related to defending against the government’s “excessive” damages demand, as well as … Continue Reading

Fourth Circuit Decision in Triple Canopy Sets up Another Implied Certification Circuit Split

On May 16, 2017, the US Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit issued a decision in US ex rel. Badr v. Triple Canopy, Inc. In this case, the government had contracted with a private security company to provide guards at a military airbase in Iraq. Although the applicable contract required the guards to have … Continue Reading

Relying on Escobar, Ninth Circuit Tosses Implied Certification Case

On January 12, 2017, the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit affirmed a district court’s grant of summary judgment in favor of a government contractor, where a relator had asserted that the contractor had violated material contractual requirements. In United States ex rel. Kelly v. SERCO, Inc., defendant SERCO provided project management, engineering … Continue Reading

Fourth Circuit Affirms Dismissal of Ex-Employee’s Retaliation Suit

On August 22, 2016, the US Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit issued a decision in Carlson v. DynCorp International LLC, affirming the district court’s dismissal of an ex-employee’s retaliation suit under the False Claims Act’s (FCA) anti-retaliation provision, 31 U.S.C. § 3730(h).  While the Fourth Circuit concluded that the district court applied a … Continue Reading

Implied Certification FCA Suit Against Defense Contractors and Retired Army Colonel Dismissed

Yet another federal court has rejected a False Claims Act (FCA) lawsuit brought under an implied certification theory, finding that non-compliance with federal laws and regulations that are not express conditions of payment cannot form the grounds for a FCA suit. On March 31, 2016, the suit brought by two former employees of MD Helicopters, … Continue Reading

District Court Dismisses FCA and Retaliation Claims Based on Allegations That Government Contractor Charged an “Unreasonable Price”

On February 25, 2016, the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia dismissed a False Claims Act (FCA) case alleging that PAE Government Services (PAE) intentionally overcharged the Department of State (DOS) for bottled water supplied to various facilities in Iraq.  United States of America ex rel. Anthony Garzione, 2016 WL 775780 … Continue Reading

Sixth Circuit Slashes “Tainted Goods” FCA Damages Award by over 95%

The United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit issued a dramatic reduction to an False Claims Act (FCA) damages award on February 4, 2016, reducing the award from  $762,894.54 to a mere $14,748, and labeling the government’s “tainted goods” damage calculation as “fairyland rather than actual.” The Sixth Circuit’s ruling in United States … Continue Reading

On Remand, Eastern District of Virginia Narrowly Construes Supreme Court’s KBR Holding

In a November 12, 2015 decision in a long running qui tam suit under the False Claims Act (FCA), the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia dismissed a relator’s case pursuant to the first-to-file bar (31 U.S.C. § 3730(b)(5)) for the second time. The case, including the meaning of the first-to-file bar, … Continue Reading

Recent Decisions Serve as Reminder that Scienter is a Fertile Ground for Pre-Trial Disposition

Last week, two different district courts dismissed False Claims Act (FCA) claims on scienter grounds — one on a motion to dismiss and one at summary judgment. While FCA plaintiffs frequently claim that scienter is a fact-intensive inquiry best resolved by the factfinder, this is often not the case, as these two decisions underscore. FCA … Continue Reading

Recent Appellate Developments in “Implied Certification”

We have previously written several articles regarding the circuit courts’ application of the so-called “implied certification” theory of liability under the False Claims Act (FCA). That theory is the subject of a petition for certiorari in the case of United States v. Triple Canopy, on which we have previously reported. Under the implied certification theory, … Continue Reading

The Fourth Circuit Denies Triple Canopy’s Petition for Rehearing En Banc

We have previously posted about the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit’s January 8 panel decision in U.S. ex rel. Badr v. Triple Canopy and its implications for “implied certification” False Claims Act (FCA) claims based on breaches of contract in the Fourth Circuit.  On Monday, March 9, the Fourth  Circuit denied … Continue Reading

The Fourth Circuit’s Triple Canopy Decision: Implied Certification Versus “Garden-Variety” Breaches of Contract (and does the Government’s intervention decision matter to the analysis?)

The Fourth Circuit’s January 8, 2015 decision in United States ex rel. Badr v. Triple Canopy, Inc. is notable in several respects.  The decision announces the court’s explicit endorsement of the “implied certification” theory of False Claims Act (FCA) liability.  However, it leaves some uncertainty regarding how that theory is to be applied in courts within … Continue Reading
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